If we don’t embrace the mobile web, we will go the way of Prodigy.  Although the internet star may have an impending death because of the mobile web, as information manager we still have a bright future if we stay ahead of the curve.  Digital Landfill presents this current look at where we are currently at:

We now find ourselves in…

  • A world in which there are now more tablets and smartphones sold than PCs.
  • A world in which more people have cell phones than toothbrushes.  Yikes.
  • A world in which our customers expect to use a mobile device to: 1) interact with us; interact with the information we provide; and 3) interact with the processes that drive our businesses.
  • A world in which our employees are increasingly working outside of traditional, chained to the desk, office environments, and expect to use multiple devices and locations to interact with corporate information and systems that we once thought of as locked down and “company confidential.”…

The natural reaction of IT in the face of this dramatic change to fall back into the control paradigm. Witness the following…

  • 76% of organizations have no mobile processes: 24% haven’t even thought about it, 20% have security reasons or feel it adds no value, 32% have evaluated it but not made a move. (Process Revolution: Moving Your Business from Paper to PC to Tablet)
  • A third of organizations have not optimized their websites for mobile. Of those that have, only 8% specifically test access to all pages and forms and only 10% have apps — and only 5% check for tablet resolution. (Process Revolution: Moving Your Business from Paper to PC to Tablet)
  • Median % of processes that could be mobile that actually are = 2.5%. (Process Revolution: Moving Your Business from Paper to PC to Tablet)
  • Only 47% of organizations allow personal devices to access company data, and most do so in a policy void. (Making the Most of Mobile:  Content on the Move)
  • Mobile access to ECM systems is somewhat restricted. 37% of organizations have no mobile access available on their ECM systems, and a further 30% would need to rely on a conventional web interface. 15% have a dedicated app, at least for iPhone. (Making the Most of Mobile: Content on the Move)
  • 42% expect staff to carry two phones, a company one and a personal one. 47% allow personal devices to access company data, but only a third of those enforce data-wipe policies. The rest rely on employee trust. 20% have no usage policy on mobile and 9% allow staff to hook up in an ad hoc way. (Making the Most of Mobile: Content on the Move)

When we think about managing content and information, we need to embrace mobile, this can’t be a tentative embrace, but an aggressive and passionate one.

The potential benefits of embracing mobile are significant:

  • Median expected productivity improvement among administrative staff for automated processes = 29%. (Process Revolution: Moving Your Business from Paper to PC to Tablet)
  • 67% of organizations believe that mobile technologies are “important or extremely important to improving their business processes. (Process Revolution: Moving Your Business from Paper to PC to Tablet)
  • Median expected productivity improvement for field-based or travelling staff if they could input directly to, and/or interact with back-office processes using mobile (hand-held) devices = 25%. (Process Revolution: Moving Your Business from Paper to PC to Tablet)
  • Median organization that has deployed mobile solutions is 2.7X faster in responding to customers and staff than those that have not. (Process Revolution: Moving Your Business from Paper to PC to Tablet)

While we can’t ignore the control factor, we need to respond aggressively to the opportunities afforded by mobile.  Mobile needs to be a part of every IT decision, not an afterthought.  We must invest in the required technical skills, which are different from traditional IT skills, which we need to take advantage of mobile. We need to set our focus on where our customers will be three years from now in terms of mobile, and figure out how our IT strategies and systems will meet them when they get there.

You can read the rest here.

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